Rice Flour

Rice flour (also rice powder) is a form of flour made from finely milled rice. It is distinct from rice starch, which is usually produced by steeping rice in lye.

Rice flour may be made from either white rice or brown rice. To make the flour, the husk of rice or paddy is removed and raw rice is obtained. The raw rice is then ground to flour. Rice flour is a particularly good substitute for wheat flour, which causes irritation in the digestive systems of those who are gluten-intolerant. Rice flour is also used as a thickening agent in recipes that are refrigerated or frozen since it inhibits liquid separation.

In Japanese, rice flour is called either komeko or mochiko.[1]

Mochiko (sweet rice flour) is made from sweet rice, also known as glutinous rice. Despite its name, this rice has no gluten. It is called mifen (Chinese: 米粉;pinyinmǐ fěn) in Chinese, galapong in Ilokano/Filipino and pirinç unu in Turkish. The flour is principally starch, plus a small amount of protein. The starch is waxy and makes an excellent gel.

{Information courtesy Wikipedia}